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TOBACCO REPORT 

1956-i957 




THE BULLETIN 

of the 

North Carolina Department of Agriculture 

L. Y. Ballextine, Commissioner 
Number 1 47 March, 1957 



NORTH CAROLINA 
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

L. Y. Ballentine, Commissioner 
John L. Reitzel, Assistant Commissioner 



STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

J. Atwell Alexander Stony Point 

W. I. Bissette Grifton 

Glenn G. Gilmore Julian 

Hoyle C. Gkiffin Monroe 

Claude T. Hall Roxboro 

George P. Kittrell Corapeake 

J. Muse McCotter New Bern 

Charles F. Phillips Thomasville 

J. H. Poole West End 

A. B. Slagle Franklin 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Tobacco Outlook for 1957 5 

International Flue-Cured Tobacco Trends S 

Acreage-Poundage Plan 13 

State Summary 1956-1957 - - 14 

North Carolina Tobacco' 

Warehouse Sales Reports for Season 1956-57 16 

Summary of Dealer and Warehouse Resales 1956-57 18 

Producer and Gross Sales of Flue-Cured Tobacco by States 1956 IS 

Stabilization Receipts by Belts 1956 IS 

North Carolina Flue-Cured Crops 1919-1956 19 

North Carolina Burley Crops 1928-1956 20 

North Carolina Tobacco Allotments 1957 21 

North Carolina Tobacco Warehouses and Operators 

by Belts and Markets 1956 24 

Domestic Cigarette Consumption by Kinds 1956 Back Cover 



FOREWORD 

This eighth annual issue of the Tobacco Report has been 
compiled and prepared by W. P. Hedrick and J. H. Cyrus, 
tobacco specialists with the Division of Markets, in coopera- 
tion with the IT. S. Department of Agriculture under the Re- 
search and Marketing Act. 

Credit is due the Cooperative Crop Reporting Service of 
the North Carolina and United States Departments of Agri- 
culture, and the Tobacco Branch of the USDA Agricultural 
Marketing Service, for much of the statistical data contained 
herein. 

This issue of The Bulletin is dedicated to agricultural 
engineering research workers, farm machinery manufacturers 
and all others who have contributed to mechanization in the 
production of flue-cured tobacco. This crop requires 480 
man-hours of labor to the acre, and mechanization plays an 
important part not only in reducing production costs, but in 
offsetting the current scarcity of farm labor. 




Commissioner of Agriculture. 



For free distribution by the Tobacco Section, Markets Division. 
North Carolina Department of Agriculture, Raleigh, N. C. 



3/57— 6M 

4 



CORRECTION 

North Carolina Tobacco Report, 1956-57 
The Bulletin 
of the 
North Carolina Department of Agriculture 

Noo 11+7 

The fourth paragraph on page 5 should road as follows: 

"Cigarette smoking appears to have returned to about normal 
for the population Consumption in 1956 was three percent above 
1955* However, it took only 1,200 million pounds of tobacco to 
make the Ij.25 billion cigarettes consumed in 1956, compared with 
1,202 6 3 million pounds used in i|.12 billion cigarettes consumed 
in 195>5« If tobacco had been used at the same rate per thousand 
cigarettes in 1956 as was used in 1955* about 35 million more 
'pounds would have gone into cigarettes last yoar e The reduction 
in use of tobacco per thousand cigarettes is substantially ac- 
counted for by the shift from non-filter brands to filter brands, 
and by the reduction in length of sonio major brands by five 
millimeters " 



FOREWORD 



This eighth annual issue of the Tobacco Report has been 
compiled and prepared by W. P. Hedrick and J. H. Cyrus, 
tobacco specialists with the Division of Markets, in coonera- 



3/57— 6M 
4 



Tobacco Outlook For 1957 

The situation facing tobacco growers in 19 57 has been building up 
for the past five years. First there was the health scare in late 1952, when 
cigarette sales declined for the first time in 20 years. Resulting from 
this has been a steadily gro-wing consumer preference for filter-tip cigar- 
ettes, which contain less tobacco than regular cigarettes and require 
more of the heavy, aromatic varieties. In the meantime, tobacco growers 
have been planting high-yielding varieties designed to produce tobacco 
of mild flavor with low nicotine content, which until recently were in 
highest demand. The latest development has been a change in manu- 
facturing processes which permit full utilization of the tobacco leaf. 

When cigarette consumption began to fall off rapidly early in 1953, 
after reaching an all-time high of 435 billion in 19 52, some manufacturers 
introduced filter-tip cigarettes in an effort to recapture the market. While 
filter-tips represented only three per cent of the cigarettes sold in 1953, 
they have gained in popularity each year since, until today they are 
used by 30 per cent of American smokers. The switch to new types of 
cigarettes set in motion a chain of reactions the full effect of which has 
not yet been felt by the industry. 

Of all the changes that have taken place, however, the reconstituting of 
tobacco will probably have the most lasting effect on our tobacco economy. 
This process makes it possible to use the whole tobacco leaf. Formerly 
tobacco used in cigarettes was stemmed, the mid rib removed and thrown 
away or used in by-products. This amounted to about 2 percent of the 
entire weight of the tobacco bought by manufacturers. Now the stems and 
scraps are ground and mixed with an additive, rolled into a sheet, shredded 
and used along with leaf tobacco in the manufacture of cigarettes. If 
this process is used by all manufacturers, the amount of leaf bought for 
cigarettes will be further reduced. 

Cigarette smoking appears to have returned to about normal for the 
population. Consumption in 1956 was three percent above 1955, totaling 
425 billion cigarettes. But it took about 35 million less pounds of tobacco 
to manufacture these 42 5 billion cigarettes than it did to make 412 
billion in 19 55. 

On Jaunary 1 the supply of flue-cured tobacco had reached more than 
3y 2 billion pounds — a record total — enough to last three years. This 
-compares with normal stocks of 2% years, and will have a depressing 
effect on the market in 1957 and a few years beyond. 

On January 1, 19 57, the Flue-cured Tobacco Cooperative Stabilization 
Corporation held 67 3 million pounds, and some of these surplus stocks 
consist of pale, slick, low-nicotine tobacco. This fact, plus the export 
demand for heavier tobacco with flavor and aroma, has caused the U. S. 
Department of Agriculture to announce that three of the most popular 
varieties of leaf planted last season — 139, 140 and 244 — will be sup- 
ported at half the 90 percent support price in 1957. 

The Secretary of Agriculture has announced a 20 percent cut In 
tobacco acreage for 19 57. The allotment for the 1957 season allows 



712,000 acres to be planted without penalty. The flue-cured price 
support program will be altered to discourage the planting of varieties 
of tobacco considered undesirable under the present buying conditions. 
Price support rates for individual grades of all flue-cured varieties will 
be adjusted to reflect current demand patterns. This is designed to en- 
courage growers to follow cultural practices that will result in a larger 
percentage of the crop having desirable flavor and aroma. 

It is expected that not more than five percent of the crop will be 
planted with high yielding seed. Therefore, with a lower yield per acre 
(about 1,450 pounds) the 1957 production should amount to about one 
billion pounds, or about 150 million less than domestic and export uses. 

The manufacturers of cigarettes use about 90 percent of the flue- 
cured crop. A gradual uptrend in the consumption of cigarettes is ex- 
pected to continue in the year ahead. The continued high levels of employ- 
ment and personal income are favorable factors. The popularity of filter 
tips is still growing and these are expected to reach 40 percent of the 
domestic market during the year. 

Pipe tobacco has been using about 40 million pounds of flue-cured 
yearly. The use of this type of tobacco will continue to decline so long 
as individual incomes remain high, as other forms of smoking are 
preferred in place of the pipe or the more economical "roll your own" 
cigarette. 

With the exceptions mentioned above, the 19 57 crop of flue-cured 
will be supported at 90 percent of parity. There will be only a slight 
change in the base price for calculating flue-cured parity. If the parity 
index remains as at this time, the 90 percent support should be slightly 
above the 48. 9 cents per pound in effect during 1956. 




Some growers report that irrigation is worth $200 per acre during dry 
years. 




Careful handling from farm to market means a better price on the 
warehouse floor. 



Taking a longer view of the tobacco picture, the outlook is a little 
brighter. Between the years 1957 and 1960 the population becoming of 
smoking age will increase by about five percent. Therefore, it can be 
assumed that cigarette consumption will continue to rise. However, the) 
amount of tobacco used by manufacturers will not necessarily increase 
in the same proportion. This depends upon how extensively the recently 
developed reconstituting process is used by manufacturers. In general 
tobacco consumption can be expected to increase as the population grows, 
if economic conditions remain good. 

On the average, foreign buyers have bought about one-third of the 
flue-cured tobacco raised in this country. Whether we can hold our 
foreign buyers depends entirely on our growers. If we continue to produce 
pale, slick, low nicotine tobacco, we can expect to lose more of our foreign 
markets. However, if growers will return to the production of high 
quality tobacco with flavor and aroma, there is little doubt that we 
can continue to supply the foreign markets. 

The time has come for our growers to look into the future and forego 
immediate gains for future progress. They must produce tobacco which 
meets the trend of consumer preference in both export and domestic trade. 



International Flue Cured Tobacco Trends 

Tobacco has been an important commodity in international trade for 
more than 300 years, beginning on a commercial scale with the English 
Colony at Jamestown in the early 1600's. Increase in world trade of to- 
bacco since Colonial days has been gradual. However, there have been 
pronounced shifts in markets as to types of tobacco entering world 
trade and sources of supply. 

World Production of Flue Cured 

In the year 1856 an accident in curing tobacco on the farm of Elisha 
Slade, in Caswell County, North Carolina, was responsible for the be- 
ginning of flue cured tobacco. Today flue cured tobacco is being grown 
in many countries around the world. 

For many years the United States was the only producer of flue 
cured tobacco, and it was not until the early 1900's that any noticeable 
amounts of flue cured tobacco were grown in foreign countries. During 
the 1920's the United States was producing about 90 percent of the world 
production, but during the middle 19.30's the U. S. production dropped 
to about two-thirds of world production. From the mid 19 30's until 
around 19 50 the United States increased its production of flue cured 
at about the same rate as foreign countries. Therefore, the U. S. main- 
tained about two-thirds of world production during those years, as shown 
in Table I. 

Table I 

United States and World Production Flue Cured 
(Four Year Periods - 1926-1955) 





World 


u. s. 


U, S. Prod, as 


Year 


Production 


Production 


% of World Prod. 


1926 


692,199,000 


560,072,000 


80.9% 


1927 


789,338,000 


718,789,000 


91.0 


192S 


807,170,000 


739,099,000 


90.1 


1929 


825,768,000 


750,012,000 


90.8 


1936 


1,038,886,000 


682,850,000 


65.7 


1937 


1,297,635,000 


866,302,000 


66.7 


1938 


1,129,867,000 


785,731,000 


69.5 


1939 


1,571,332,000 


1,170,910,000 


75.1 


1946 


1,833,000,000 


1,352,024,000 


73.7 


1947 


1,877,000,000 


1,317,466,000 


70.2 


1948 


1,815,000,000 


1,089,584,000 


60.0 


1949 


1,750,000,000 


1,114,508,000 


63.7 


1952 


2,258,670,000 


1,365,341,000 


60.4 


1953 


2,209,903,000 


1,272,200,000 


57.5 


1954 


2,502,862,000 


1,314,407,000 


52.5 


1955 


2,726,006,000 


1,483,045,000 


54.5 



By 1954, the U. S. production of flue cured had dropped to 52.5 per- 
cent of world production, but some of that loss was regained in 1955 
due to increased yields in the U. S. 

It should be noted on Chart I that the production of flue cured 
tobacco in foreign countries has been fairly stable since 19 54, with the 
exception of Japan, which has shown a steady increase in production 
since the end of World War II. Therefore, most of the increase in world 
production of flue cured tobacco during the last three or four years 
has been due to increased yields in the United States. 



ESTIMATED WORLD PRODUCTION OF FLUE-CURED TOBACCO: 
AVERAGES, 1935-39 a 1947-51; ANNUAL.I952 THROUGH 1955 

(Farm-Sales-Weight) 
Billion Pounds" 



2.5 - 




1935-39 1947-5 



Includes Communist China. 



Chart I 



AVorld Trade in fFlue Cured 

Free world export trade in unmanufactured flue cured tobacco during 
the calendar year 19 5 5 was the largest on record, totaling 69 3 million 
pounds dry weight (776 million lbs. farm sale weight). United States 
exports of flue cured tobacco during the calendar year 1955 amounted 
to 455 million pounds dry weight (510 million lbs. farm sale weight). 
Thus, the U. S. exports of flue cured in 1955 accounted for 66 percent 
of the free world trade in flue cured tobacco. 

The leading free world exporters of flue cured, other than the United 
States, are the Central African Federation (which includes Southern and 
Northern Rhodesia and Nyasaland), India and Canada. A comparison of 
free world exports of flue cured over a period of years is illustrated in 
Chart II. It can be seen from this chart that our biggest competitors in 



the world market for flue cured tobacco are Africa, India and Canada. 
Within these competing countries, the only ones showing any substantial 
increase in exports from 1954 to 1955 were the United States, which 
showed an increase in 19 55 of 80 million pounds; Canada, which showed 
an increase of 15 million pounds; and India, which had an increase in 
exports of 10 million pounds in 1955. The Rhodesias and Nyasaland 
showed a decrease of about two million pounds in exports. 

It should be remembered that the flue cured tobacco grown in foreign 
countries is relatively neutral and lacking in flavor and aroma. Therefore, 1 
as long as the United States continues to produce an aromatic type of 
flue cured tobacco, which cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the 
world, we will continue to supply the largest share of the free world 
market for flue cured tobacco. 



FREE WORLD EXPORTS OF FLUE-CURED TOBACCO: 
AVERAGES, 1935-39 ft 1947-51; ANNUAL,I952 THROUGH 1955 



(Declared Weight) 



Million Pounds 



600 



400 



200 













'•'•'■'■'■ 




! \ II 


































WW//. 


















/////////, 






</////////, 







-Others* 

Central African 
Federation 

•India 

•Canada 



United 
"States 



1935-39 1947-51 1952 1953 1954 1955 

Average Average 

Excludes Communist China. 



Chart n 



l T . S. Domestic and Export Trade 

The U. S. flue cured tobacco farmer, who is depending upon the U. S.| 
domestic and export trade for a sound economic backing, has seen radical 
changes come over the market during the last few years. This is especially 
true in the domestic market, where the consumer preference for filter 
tip cigarettes caused a shift in company buying patterns from the thinner, 
milder grades to the heavier, more aromatic grades. This change puts do- 
mestic buyers in direct competition with export buyers,, which has caused 
a sharp increase in price on some of the export grades. 



in 



The filter tip has not only changed the buying pattern, but it has 
reduced domestic demand for flue cured tobacco. First, the filter plug 
displaces a large quantity of tobacco. Next, the advent of the filter 
cigarette has made it possible for companies to use a "synthetic tobacco" 
made principally from stems and scrap that was considered a waste or 
by-product only a few years ago. This permits the manufacturers to 
make more cigarettes out of fewer pounds of tobacco, which accounts 
in part for the continuous drop in domestic use of flue cured. In 19 52, 
filter cigarettes represented only 1.3 per cent of total cigarette production, 
while in 1956, 30 per cent of the cigarettes manufactured were filters. 
This drop in domestic disappearance is shown in Table II. Thus, the 
U. S. domestic use of flue cured tobacco, when compared with world 
production, is dropping further behind each year, while the number of 
cigarettes being manufactured and consumed in the U. S. is increasing 
each year. 



Table II 

U. S. Domestic Use and Export Trends as Percentage 
of World Production 



(July -June Market Year) 



Year 



Domestic Use 



Exports 



Domestic Exports 

Use as % of as % of 

World Prod. World Prod. 



1926 


154,000,000 


288,671,000 


22.2 


41.7 


1927 


189,000,000 


328,924,000 


23.8 


41.7 


1928 


202,000,000 


413,949,000 


25.0 


51.3 


1929 


201.000,000 


429,942,000 


24.3 


52.1 


1936 


268,000,000 


302,640,000 


25.7 


29.1 


1937 


279,000,000 


361,919,000 


21.5 


27.9 


1938 


285,000,000 


362,501,000 


25.3 


32.1 


1939 


418,000,000 


252,208,000 


26.6 


16.1 


1946 


659,000,000 


553,000,000 


35.9 


30.2 


1947 


695,000,000 


359,000,000 


36.9 


19.1 


1948 


720,000,000 


382,000,000 


39.6 


21.1 


1949 


729,000,000 


439,000,000 


41.1 


25.1 


1952 


828,000,000 


416,000,000 


36.6 


18.4 


1953 


778,000,000 


431,000,000 


35.2 


19.5 


1954 


744,000,000 


429,000,000 


29.7 


17.1 


1955 


728,000,000 


553,500,000 


27.0 


20.2 



11 



The U. S. exports of flue cured tobacco during the same period from 
1952 through 1955 have shown a more favorable trend. According to 
data in Table II, exports have shown an upward trend during this period, 
reaching a record level in 1955 of 553.5 million pounds. Table II shows 
that the ratio of U. S. exports to world production increased from 18.4 
percent in 1952 to 20.2 percent in 1955, which is an indication that U. S. 
exports increased at a more rapid rate than world production. 

During the past ten years, or since the end of World War II, there has 
been a great deal of shifting in world market for flue cured tobacco. In 
these shifts the United States lost some of its market in dollar-short 
areas such as the United Kingdom, but enough new markets were de- 
veloped during this period to more than off-set the losses that occurred 
in some of the older markets. Thus, the statistical data in Table II indi-j 
cates that the U. S. flue cured tobacco grower is suffering more at present 
from the weakening demand in the domestic market. 



12 



Acreage-Poundage Plan 

Efforts will be made at this Session of Congress to change the control 
program from a straight acreage basis to a combined acreage-poundage 
system which would be self-adjusting from year to year. 

The U. S. Department of Agriculture officials and some farm organiza- 
tions are leaning strongly toward the acreage-poundage proposal. How- 
ever it will take action by Congress and a two-thirds approval by growers 
in a referendum to put the plan into effect. 

In appraising the plan growers should weigh the following suggested 
advantages and disadvantages: 

Advantages that have been suggested: 

1. Makes possible a sound price support program. 

2. Provides for more effective and enforceable controls. 

3. Protects the relative position of cooperating growers. 

4. Allows for balancing good crop years against poor. 

5. Allows for adjustments in management on the farm. 

6. Improves administration in that it provides a check on the farm 
and at the market. 

7. Retains elements of acreage control as presently understood. 

Disadvantages of the plan that have been suggested: 

1. Increases administrative problems and costs. 

2. Possibly reduces the export types of tobacco when lower grades 
do not move to market. 

3. Complicates, to a certain extent, the landlord-tenant relation- 
ship. 

4. Requires the warehouseman to use more care in handling mar- 
keting cards. 



13 



State Summary 1956-1957 

North Carolina flue cured tobacco growers experienced another drop 
in the average price paid for the 19 56 crop, but new record yields per 
acre helped to boost the total value of the crop. 

Burley growers found a much stronger market for their 195 6 crop, 
setting new high records in average prices and value per acre which gave 
burley growers their best season on record. 

During the 19 56 season, the usual 44 flue cured markets operated 
in North Carolina with total producer sales of 93S,279,677 pounds, re- 
turning flue cured growers a sum of $486,106,100. This is a season; 
average of $51.81. In 1955 producer sales amounted to 961,088,374 
pounds, selling for $512,108,896, and averaging $53.28 per hundred. 
There was a total drop in poundage sales in 1956 of 22,808,697 pounds 
and a drop in value of $26,002,796 as compared with 1955. 

Type 13 — The 19 56 marketing season started in North Carolina 
on August 3, with the opening of the eight North Carolina Border 
Belt Markets. The 1956 crop compared very favorably in quality with 
the good 19 55 crop, except for the first two primings which contained a 
large quantity of dead tobacco due to the rank growth on the 1956 
crop. Prices were generally stronger on most grades of leaf, smoking 
leaf and nondescript, with increases ranging from $1.00 to $10.00 above 
the prices paid in 1955. Most cutter, lug and priming grades averaged 
from $1.00 to $6.00 lower than the year before. 

Producer sales on the North Carolina Border Markets reached 15 6,- 
397,606 pounds for the season, selling for $85,951,098, which is a season 
average of $54.96 per hundred. This is slightly higher than the average I 
of $54.11 received in 1955 when growers sold 168,431,765 pounds for 
$91,141,060. Thus the growers in this belt sold 12,0 34,159 pounds less) 
tobacco in 1956 which caused a drop in value of $5,189,962 compared 
with 19 55. Markets began closing in this belt during the latter part off 
September, but final sales were held on October IS for a season of 53 
sale days compared with 55 days in 19 55. 

Type 12 — The 17 Eastern Belt Markets opened for the 19 56 season on! 
August 2 3. The gross sales on Eastern Markets were only four percent 
less than last year despite a 11 percent reduction in acreage. This was 
due to the record yield of 1,750 pounds per acre. Average prices by; 
grades showed a few more losses than gains when compared with 19 5 5,: 
but most leaf, smoking leaf and non-descript showed increases from 
$1.00 to $3.00 per hundred. A majority of the cutter, lug and priming 
grades showed declines ranging from $1.00 to $3.00 per hundred. 

Season producer sales amounted to 477,816,430 pounds, returning 
growers $247,654,045, and averaging $51.83 per hundred. This is only 
19,846,070 pounds short of the record sales in 1955 of 497,662,500 
pounds. The value of the 19 56 crop was $15,766,841 less than the 

14 



$263,420,886 received for the 1955 crop, which averaged $52.93 per 
hundred. The Eastern Belt held final sales on November 2 after oper- 
ating through 62 sale days, as compared to 64 sale days in 19 55. 

Type 11 B — The 10 Middle Belt Markets held the first sales of the 
season on September 10. This is the latest opening date for the Middle 
Belt since 194 7. The quality of the crop was not as good as in 19 5 5, due 
to a larger amount of undesirable tobacco. There was a general decrease 
in average prices by grades from the previous season. Most of the losses 
ranged from $1.00 to $5.00 per hundred. However, a few of the leaf 
and smoking leaf grades did show advances of $1.00 to $2.00. 

Growers in this belt received $S7,289,095 for the 166,773,328 pounds 
sold during the season, for an average of $52.34 per hundred. In 1955 
these growers received $83,628,538 for 157,913,754 pounds of tobacco, 
averaging $52.9 6. Thus, the 1956 producer sales showed an increase of 
8,859,574 pounds and the value of the crop showed an increase of 
$3,660,557 over the previous season. Sales in the Middle Belt ended on 
December 7, extending over a period of 61 sale days compared with 64 days 
in 1955. 

Type 11 A — Auction sales began on the nine Old Belt Markets in North 
Carolina on September 2 4. The quality of the 19 56 crop was consider- 
ably lower than that of the previous year, and a majority of the grade 
prices also showed declines ranging chiefly from $1.00 to $4.00 below 
the 1955 level. However, there were price increases of $1.00 to $2.00 
on several smoking leaf and non-descript grades, but increases were 
off-set by losses on other grades. 

Producer sales on North Carolina Old Belt Markets reached 137,292,313 
pounds for the season, returning the growers $65,211,862, which is a 
season average of $47.50 per hundred. The 1955 season average was 
$53.92 for 137,080,355 pounds of tobacco, which returned growers 
$73,918,410. The North Carolina Old Belt Markets completed sales for 
the season on December 19, with the exception of a clean-up sale in 
January at Reidsville and Winston-Salem. 

Type 31 — North Carolina Burley Markets at Asheville, Boone and West 
Jefferson started 1956-57 auction sales on November 27, which is one 
of the earliest opening dates on record. The general quality of the 19 56 
crop was inferior to the 19 55 crop, but unprecedented high prices pushed 
the market average to an all-time record high. The average prices paid 
for practically all grades increased $1.00 to $21.00 per hundred as com- 
pared with the previous year. The amount of tobacco going under Govern- 
ment loan dropped to slightly more than one percent. 

Burley growers sold 15,405,060 pounds on North Carolina Markets 
during the season, for a return of $9,527,243, which gave them a new 
record average of $61.84 per hundred pounds. The previous high average 
was made in 1955 when growers averaged $57.15 per hundred for 
16,302,836 pounds, which paid them a sum of $9,316,3 63. North Caro- 
lina Burley Markets held final sales on January 9, 19 57, covering 2 5 
sale days compared with 2 8 during the previous season. 

15 



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Summary of N. C. Dealer and Warehouse 
Resales- 1956-1957 



Belt 


Pounds 


Dollars 


Ayg. Price 


Percentage 

Resales 


Border Belt 










Dealer 
Warehouse 


5,944,010 

9,525,788 


82,521,868 
4,966,100 


$42.38 
52.13 


3.5 
5.5 


Eastern Belt 










Dealer 
Warehouse 


10,794,042 
19,590,111 


4,445,841 
9,448,114 


41.19 
48.23 


2.1 
3.9 


Middle Belt 










Dealer 
Warehouse 


5,996,924 
6,623,064 


2,587,696 
3,208,570 


43.15 

48.45 


3.3 
3.7 


Old Belt 










Dealer 
Warehouse 


6,619,444 
8,733,954 


2,842,048 
4,077,301 


42.93 
46.68 


4.3 

5.7 


Burley Belt 










Dealer 
Warehouse 


314,99S 
1,894,668 


182,756 
1,144,935 


58.02 
60.43 


1.8 
10.8 



Producer and Gross Sales of Flue-Cured 
Tobacco By States— 1956 



State 



PRODUCER SALES 
Pounds Avg. Price 



GROSS SALES 
Pounds Avg. Price 



North Carolina 938,279,677 

Virginia ... 169,754,657 

South Carolina 146,170,679 

Georgia 149,486,851 

Florida „ 17,921,736 

TOTALS ....1,421,613,600 



$51.81 
52.42 
52.36 
48.46 
48.70 


1,012,107,014 

180,128,307 

160,731,708 

162,598,886 

20,510,149 


$51.40 
52.19 
51.85 
47.95 
48.50 


$51.55 


1,536,076,064 


$51.14 



Stabilization Receipts By Belts— 1956 



Belt 


Type 


Producer Sales 
(Pounds) 


Stabilization 
Receipts (Lbs.) 


Percentage 
Stab. Rec'd. 


Old Belt 

Middle Belt 

Fastern Belt 

Border Belt 


11A 

11 B 

12 
13 


307,046,970 
166,773,328 
477,816,430 
302,568,285 
167,408,587 

1,421,613,600 


64,827,172 
50,635,941 
128,057,566 
62,810,719 
13,546,683 

319,878,081 


21.1 
30.4 
26.8 
20 8 


Georgia-Florida Belt _ 


14 


8.1 


TOTALS 


11-14 


22.5 



North Carolina Flue-Cured Crops 1919-1956 







Yield Per 








Year 


No. Acres 


Acre 


Production 


Value 


Average 






(Pounds) 


(1,000 lbs.) 


(1,000 Dollars) 


Price 


1919 


521,500 


612 


319,276 


$157,340 


$49.30 


1920 


621,900 


681 


423,703 


88,271 


20.80 


1921 


414,900 


594 


246,540 


60,402 


24.50 


1922 


444,000 


611 


271,170 


74,572 


27.50 


1923 


544,300 


72S 


396,354 


81,998 


20.70 


1924 


473,500 


585 


276,819 


62,597 


22.60 


1925 


536,200 


696 


373,352 


83,756 


22.40 


1926 


546,700 


692 


378,274 


96,762 


25.60 


1927 


639,600 


755 


482,982 


100,414 


20.80 


1928 


712,400 


692 


493,132 


93,450 


19.00 


1929 


729,300 


665 


484,630 


89,470 


18.50 


1930 


768,000 


757 


581,200 


74,733 


12.90 


1931 


688,500 


692 


476,382 


42,024 


8.80 


1932 


462,500 


624 


288,750 


34,949 


12.10 


1933 


667,800 


794 


530,133 


85,530 


16.10 


1934 


486,500 


847 


412,055 


117,999 


28.60 


1935 


612,500 


635 


572,625 


116,418 


20.30 


1936 


591,000 


765 


451,975 


101,856 


22.50 


1937 


675,000 


883 


595,815 


143,058 


24.00 


1938 


603,500 


844 


509,470 


115,428 


22.70 


1939 


843,000 


964 


812,540 


123,893 


15.20 


1940 


498,000 


1,038 


516,835 


85,792 


16.60 


1941 


488,000 


92S 


452,825 


132,291 


29.20 


1942 


539,000 


1,052 


566,810 


221,538 


39.10 


1943 


580,000 


935 


542,200 


219,074 


40.40 


1944 


684,000 


1,077 


736,990 


317,628 


43.10 


1945 


722,000 


1,100 


794,310 


349,148 


44.00 


1946 


802,000 


1,138 


912,970 


451,639 


49.50 


1947 


783,000 


1,139 


S92.205 


374,513 


42.00 


1948 


594,000 


1,239 


739,380 


368,040 


49.80 


1949 


621,000 


1,178 


731,530 


352,685 


48.20 


1950 


640,000 


1,341 


S58,140 


477,508 


55.60 


1951 


735,000 


1,331 


978,375 


523,358 


53.50 


1952 


735,000 


1,222 


898,090 


448,582 


49.90 


1953 


674,000 


1,235 


832,305 


447,076 


53.70 


1954 


686,000 


1,204 


889,490 


483,003 


54.30 


1955 


653,000 


1,499 


978,775 


520,845 


53.20 


1956** 


580,000 


1,641 


951,580 


493,690 


51.90 



Source: N. C. and U. S. D. A. Crop Reporting Service. 
Preliminary for 19 56. 



North Carolina Burley Crops-! 928-1 956* 







Yield Per 








Year 


No. Acres 


Acre 


Production 


Value 


Average 






( Pounds ) 


(1,000 lbs.) 


(1,000 Dollars) 


Price 


1928 


3,600 


650 


2,340 


$ 690 


$29.50 


1929 


5,500 


730 


4,015 


863 


21.50 


1930 


7,200 


750 


5,400 


853 


15.80 


1931 


7,100 


710 


5,041 


464 


9.20 


1932 


6,500 


735 


4,778 


726 


15.20 


1933 


9,200 


785 


7,222 


715 


9.90 


1934 


5,500 


870 


4,785 


809 


17.50 


1935 


5,200 


925 


4,810 


1,025 


21.30 


1936 


6,000 


900 


5,400 


2,095 


38.80 


1937 


9,000 


975 


8,775 


1,787 


21.40 


1938 


8,600 


900 


7,740 


1,308 


16.90 


1939 


8,100 


1,070 


8,667 


1,447 


16.70 


1940 


6,500 


1,050 


6,825 


1,242 


18.20 


1941 


6,200 


1,075 


6,665 


2,093 


31.40 


1942 


6,600 


1,150 


7,590 


3,211 


42.30 


1943 


8,500 


1,225 


10,412 


5,102 


49.00 


1944 


12,000 


1,390 


16,680 


8,157 


48.90 


1945 


13,000 


1,500 


19,500 


7,568 


38.30 


1946 


9,800 


1,475 


14,455 


5,999 


41.50 


1947 


9,600 


1,560 


14,976 


6,335 


42.30 


1948 


10,300 


1,680 


17,304 


8,012 


46.30 


1949 


10,800 


1,440 


15,552 


6,750 


43.40 


1950 


10,500 


1,700 


17,850 


9,175 


51.40 


1951 


12,200 


1,750 


21,350 


11,572 


54.20 


1952 


12,000 


1,680 


20,160 


9,818 


48.70 


1953 


11,400 


1,800 


20,520 


11,019 


53.70 


1954 


12,700 


1,920 


24,384 


12,680 


52.00 


1955 


9,800 


1,900 


18,620 


10,651 


57.20 


1956** 


9,800 


1,800 


17,640 


10,902 


61.80 



* Source: N. C. and U. S. D. A. Crop Reporting Service. 
** Estimate of Division of Markets based on Producer's sales. 



20 



N. C. Flue-Cured Tobacco Allotments-1957 



County 



No. Farms 



Acres 



Hank 



Alexander 954 

Anson 260 

Beaufort 2,641 

Bertie 1,881 

Bladen ..—- - 3,6 65 

Brunswick 1,880 

Cabarrus 1 

Caldwell - - 268 

Camden 2 

Carteret - 427 

Caswell --- - 1,960 

Catawba — 4 

Chatham 1,129 

Chowan 200 

Cleveland 5 

Columbus 5,420 

Craven 1,890 

Cumberland - 2,499 

Dare — - 1 

Davidson 1,729 

Davie 838 

Duplin 4,987 

Durham - - - 1,053 

Edgecombe 1,633 

Forsyth - 2,207 

Franklin 2,904 

Gaston — 1 

Gates - 128 

Granville - 2,145 

Greene - -- 1,230 

Guilford - - - 3,183 

Halifax 2,293 

Harnett - - 3,973 

Hertford - ., - 1,052 

Hoke - - 1,011 

Iredell 801 



1,382.45 


50 


392.80 


61 


9,498.96 


21 


5,664.09 


32 


7,388.18 


2 8 


3,274.19 


42 


.03 


-■1 


475.23 


59 


4.66 


66 


1,342.21 


51 


9,111.57 


23 


5.29 


65 


2,910.16 


46 


541.82 


58 


. 3 5 


7 


16,313.25 


7 


8,456.48 


24 


5,206.60 


34 


.0 7 


71 


3,254.91 


4 3 


1,171.90 


53 


15,417.18 


8 


3,861.55 


39 


11,394.88 


16 


4,898.60 


35 


11,346.39 


IS 


4.59 


67 


266.06 


62 


13,223.60 


13 


11,938.57 


15 


9,110.38 


22 


5,848.33 


31 


14,470.96 


10 


3,210.96 


45 


2,831.78 


47 


1,209.95 


52 



21 



N. C. Flue-Cured Tobacco Allotments— 1957— Cont'd. 



County 



No. Farms 



Acres 



Rank 



Johnston _ 5,893 

Jones 939 

Lee - 1,346 

Lenoir 1,931 

Martin 1,68 6 

Mecklenburg 1 

Montgomery 432 

Moore 1,581 

Nash 3,100 

New Hanover 90 

Northampton 222 

Onslow 1,906 

Orange 916 

Pamlico 429 

Pender 1,759 

Person 1,789 

Pitt 2,700 

Randolph 1,626 

Richmond 1,076 

Robeson 5,179 

Rockingham 3,078 

Rowan 46 

Sampson 5,855 

Scotland 516 

Stokes 2,812 

Surry 3,229 

Tyrrell 2 

Vance 1,511 

Wake - - - - 4,022 

Warren — - — 2,025 

Washington — 298 

Wayne - - 3,145 

Wilkes ,- 1,007 

Wilson - - 2,214 

Yadkin — — - 2,767 

124,808 



22,425.45 


2 


5,371.02 


33 


4,069.62 


38 


13,865.75 


12 


8,407.34 


25 


.50 


69 


961.24 


56 


4,579.84 


37 


18,012.25 


5 


213.61 


63 


468.64 


60 


6,199.62 


29 


3,273.85 


41 


1,086.28 


55 


3,232.65 


44 


9,546.55 


20 


25,117.10 


1 


3,274.09 


40 


2,072.54 


4S 


20,531.40 


3 


12,931.86 


14 


46.66 


64 


15,125.73 


9 


1,150.06 


54 


11,390.98 


17 


10,848.21 


19 


1.90 


68 


8,059.56 


2 6 


19,280.46 


4 


6,069.41 


30 


950.67 


57 


14,391.39 


11 


1,532.27 


49 


16,656.40 


6 


7,992.50 


-. ;, 27 


469,253.94 


1-72 



22 



N. C. Burley Tobacco Allotments-1957 

County No. Farms Acres Rank 

Alamance 

Alleghany 

Ashe 

Avery — 

Brunswick 

Buncombe ~ 

Burke — 

Caldwell 

Catawba 

Cherokee 

Clay - 

Cleveland .... 

Davidson 

Gaston — 

Graham 

Granville 

Haywood 

Henderson 

Iredell 

Jackson 

Lincoln 

McDowell 

Macon 

Madison 

Mitchell - 

Polk 

Randolph 

Rutherford 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Watauga 

Wilkes 

Yadkin 

Yancey 



23 



1,425 


4,687.56 


36 


468 


216.32 


9 


2,393 


1,097.38 


5 


243 


112.58 


11 


1 


.10 


34 


3,030 


1,633.95 


2 


11 


4.30 


22 


24 


9.92 


20 


5 


1.40 


26 


168 


62.01 


15 


190 


81.25 


12 


9 


2.90 


23 


3 


1.37 


2 7 


1 


.67 


30 


704 


339.69 


8 


1 


.10 


3 4 


1,998 


1,138.95 


4 


115 


46.26 


16 


4 


1.70 


25 


308 


120.42 


10 


1 


.30 


33 


8 3 


26.95 


19 


211 


64.56 


14 


3,001 


2,564.31 


1 


938 


510.98 


7 


6 


1.50 


24 


1 


.60 


31 


66 


29.78 


18 


2 


.30 


32 


8 


.90 


29 


239 


69.05 


13 


67 


32.26 


17 


1,581 


794.68 


6 


24 


3.70 


21 


1 


.10 


28 


1,892 


1,130.45 


3 


17,797 


10,101.69 


1-34 



North Carolina Tobacco Warehouses and 
Operators By Belts and Markets-1956 

N. C. BORDER BELT 

Chadbourn (one set buyers) 

Carters — A. E. & Jack Garrett 
Meyers — J. H. Harper, J. D. Hendley 
New Farmers— Charlie Teachey, J. C. Green 

Clarkton (one set buyers) 

Bright Leaf — J. H. Bryant, B. F. Rivenbark 
New Bladen — E. C. Huff, W. McDuffie, N. Cox 
Clarkton Whse. — J. J. Webster, G. D. Rakestraw 

Fair Bluff (one set buyers) 

Powell — A. H. Powell & Sons 
Planters — N. N. Love, Carl Meares 
Littleton's No. 1 & 2 — O. P. Littleton 

Fairmont (four sets buyers) 

Big 5 — E. J. Chambers, Yarboro & Garrett Co. 

Robeson County — E. J. Chambers, Yarboro & Garrett Co. 

Peoples — E. J. Chambers, Yarboro & Garrett Co. 

Davis — F. A. Davis, Harry & Jack Mitchell 

Mitchell-Davis — F. A. Davis, Harry & Jack Mitchell 

Frye No. 1 & 2 — E. H. Frye, J. W. and J. M. Holliday 

Holliday — E. H. Frye, J. W. and J. M. Holliday 

Planters No. 1 & 2 — G. R. Royster 

Square Deal 1-2-3 — W. G. Bassett 

Star-Carolina 1-2-3 — C. A. Blankenship, W. G. Sheets, W. M. Puckett 

Twin State 1-2-3 — P. R. Floyd, Jr., Paul Wilson 

Liberty — F. P. Joyce, Joe Pell 

'Fayetteville (one set buyers) 

Big Farmers 1 & 2 — R. H. Barbour, P. L. Campbell 
Planters — J. W. Stephenson, J. C. Adams 

Xaunberton (three sets buyers) 

Carolina — M. A. Roycroft, J. L. Townsend, J. Johnson 
Smith-Dixie — N. A. McKeithan, E. K. Biggs 
Hedgepeth — R. A. Hedgepeth, R. L. Rollins 
Liberty — R. E. Wilkens, R. H. Livermore 
Star, Inc. — Hogan Teater, D. T. Stephenson 
Lumberton Cooperative — C. E. McLaurin, Mgr. 

Tabor City (one set buyers) 

Carolina — R. C. Coleman, Mrs. Harriet Sikes 
New Farmers — R. C. Coleman, Mrs. Harriet Sikes 
Planters — Don Watson, Mgr. 

24 



Whiteville (three sets buyers) 

Big Dixie — Jimmy Morgan, Clyde Roberts, Ralph Stephens 
Brooks — Blair Motley, Jr.. G. E. & R. W. Crutchfield 
Crutchfield — G. E. & R. W. Crutchfield, Blair Motley, Jr. 
Lea's No. 1 & 2 — William Townes Lea, Louie Price 
Moores — A. H. Moore, C. C. Mason, C. F. Jeffcoat 
Nelson's No. 1 & 2 — John H. Nelson 

Perkins-Newman — H. L. & J. W. Perkins, N. C. Newman 
Planters No. 1 & 2 — A. O. King, Jr., J. W. Peay 
Farmers — A. Dial Gray, J. L. Neal 
Columbus County — A. Dial Gray, J. L. Neal 
Carolina — Ralph C. Stephens, Walter Clark 
Liberty- — J. W. Hooks, Carl Bryan 

EASTERN BELT 

Ahoskie (one set buyers) 

Basnight — No. 1-2-3 — L. L. Wilkens, H. G. Veazey 
Farmers No. 1 & 2 — W. D. Odom, E. R. Evans 

Clinton (one set buyers) 

Carolina — Mrs. McWhorter Hamilton, L. D. Herring, C. J. Strickland 

Ross No. 2 — Guy R. Ross 

Farmers — H. A. Carr, J. A. Chesnut, J. J. Hill 

Dunn (one set buyers) 

Big 4 Warehouse— E. L. Dudley, T. B. Smothers, O. G. Calhoun 
Planters — A. B. Currin 

Farmville (two sets buyers) 

Bell's — Mrs. L. R. Bell & Sons, C. C. Ivey 
Farmers — John N. Fountain, Mgr. 
Fountains — John N. Fountain, Mgr. 
Monk's No. 1 & 2 — J. Y. Monk, R. D. Rouse 
Planters— M. J. Moye, Chester Worthington 

Goldsboro (one set buyers) 

Carolina — S. G. Best, Bruce Smith 

Farmers No. 1 & 2 — S. B. Hill, Carl Holloman, J. F. Hill 

Littleton — O. L. Littleton, H. C. Whitley 

Victory — J. O. Hopewell, Richard Gray 

Big Brick — J. R. Musgrave 

Greenville (five sets buyers) 

Dixie — W. T. Cannon, Carlton Dail 

Farmers — J. A. Tripp 

Planters Coop.— Elbert Bennett, Mgr. 

McGowan's No. 1 & 2 — C. H. McGowan 

Morton's — W. Z. Morton 

New Carolina No. 1 & 2— Floyd McGowan 

New Independent — Bob Cullipher, F. F. Pollard 

New Enterprise — G. B. Jones 

Smith & Suggs — B. B. Suggs, G. V. Smith 

25 



Greenville — Cont'd. 

Raynor & Harris- — C. C. Harris, James W. Reavis 

Keels — W. S. Edwards 

Harris & Rogers — R. E. Rogers 

Kinston (four full sets buyers — fifth set incomplete) 
Brooks — J. R. & J. H. Brooks 
Central — J. E. Jones, C. W. Wooten 
Eagle Warehouse Co. — W. H. Jones, Percy Holden 
New Carolina — W. H. Jones, Percy Holden 
Farmers — J. T. Jenkins 
Kinston Cooperative — D. W. Hodges, Mgr. 
Knott Warehouse, Inc. — K. W. Loftin, Mgr. 
Knotts New — H. G. Knott, W. E. Brewer 
New Dixie — John Jenkins, Mgr. 
Planters — D. W. Hodges, Mgr. 
Sheppard No. 1 & 2— R. E. Sheppard 
Tapps — Bill King, Mgr. 
The Star Warehouse — C. J. Herring 

Robersonville (one set buyers) 

Adkins & Bailey — I. M. Little, R. K. Adkins 

New Red Front — J. H. Gray, J. W. Peay 

Planters No. 1 & 2 — H. T. Highsmith, E. G. Anderson 

Rocky Mount (four sets buyers) 

Cobb & Foxhall No. 1 & 2 — W. E. Cobb 

Mangum — Roy M. Phipps 

Planters No. 1-2-3 — W. B. Faulkner, Mgr. 

Smith No. 1 & 2 — James D. Smith 

Works Warehouse — R. J. Works & Son 

Easley Warehouse Co., Inc. — H. A. Easley, Mgr. 

Farmers Warehouse, Inc. — J. Holt Evans, Mgr. 

Fenners — J. B. Fenner 

Sniithfield (two sets buyers) 

Big Planters — J. B. Wooten 

Farmers No. 1 & 2 — G. G. Adams, W. L. Kennedy 

Gold Leaf No. 1 & 2 — R. A. Pearce 

Perkins Riverside — N. L. Perkins 

Wallace No. 1 & 2 — Lawrence and Dixon Wallace 

Tarboro (one set buyers) 

Clarks No. 1 & 2 — H. I. Johnson, S. A. McConkey 
Farmers No. 1 & 2 — W. L. House, J. P. Bunn 
Victory No. 1 & 2 — Cliff Weeks, W. L. Leggett 

Wallace (one set buyers) 

Blanchard & Farrior — O. C. Blanchard, W. H. Farrior 
Hussey No. 1 & 3 — W. L. Hussey, G. D. Bennett 
Sheffield's — Garland & John Sheffield 



Washington (one set buyers) 

Gravely's — H. C. Gravely, W. A. Gravely 

Sermons No. 1 & 2 — W. J. Sermons, J. E. Roberson, Harry McMullin 

Hassell-Edwards 1 & 2 — M. M. Hassell. W. S. Edwards 

Farmers Whse. Inc. — Ross Douglas 

Wendell (two set buyers ) 

Central — Banners No. 1 & 2 — Stephenson Bros. 

Farmers — L. R. Clark & Son 

Star — Northside — G. Dean, J. H. Sanders 

Planters — Walter Walker 

Liberty 1 & 2 — H. F. Harris, I. D. Medlin, J. W. Dale 

Wilson (five sets buyers ) 

Big Dixie — E. B. Hicks, W. C. Thompson 

Wainwright — G. L. Wainwright 

Center Brick No. 1-2-3 — Cozart & Eagles Co. 

Farmers — J. J. Gibbons, S. G. Deans 

Growers Cooperative — S. E. Griffin, Mgr. 

New Planters No. 1 & 2 — R. T. & W. C. Smith, B. W. Carr 

Smith Warehouse, Inc., A B & C — H. H. Harris, Jr., Mgr. 

Watson — U. H. Cozart, Jr., Pres. 

Clark's — C. R. & Boyd Clark 

New Liberty — Carl B. Renfro 

Williamston (one set buyers) 

Carolina 1 & 2 — S. C. Griffin, H. L. Barnhill, J. B. Taylor, E. Lilley 
Farmer — S. C. Griffin, H. L. Barnhill, J. B. Taylor, E. Lilley 
Planters— J. W. Gurkin, J. R. Rogers 
Roanoke-Dixie — J. W. Gurkin, J. R. Rogers 

"Windsor (one set buyers ) 

Planters 1 & 2 — C. B. & B. U. Griffin, J. D. & Charles Marshall 
Heckstall — J. H. Gray, E. G. Anderson 

MIDDLE BELT 

Aberdeen (one set buyers) 

New Aberdeen — George Mabe, Tom Faulkner 
Planters— Bill Maurer 
Hardee's — Hugh T. Hardee 

Carthage — (one set buyers) 

McConnells — G. H. Carter, W. C. Fox 
Smothers — R. D. Smothers, Tom Smothers 
Victory — R. L. Comer, Jimmy Morgan 

Durham (three sets buyers) 

Liberty — John & Walker Stone 

Roycroft — H. T., M. A. & J. K. Roycroft, J. C. Currin 

Star-Brick — A. L. Carver, Cozart, Currin 

Farmers — J. M. Talley, Howard Talley, Bob Dale, Sam Mangum 

Planters — J. M. Talley, Howard Talley, Bob Dale, Sam Mangum 



Ellerbe (one set buyers) 

Farmers — L. G. Dewitt, Monroe Fagg, J. C. Wyatt 
Richmond County — W. H. & H. P. Rummage, W. B. Davis 

[Fuquay-Varina (two sets buyers) 

Big Top — King Roberts, E. E. Clayton 
New Deal — W. M., A. R., A. L. Talley 
Southside — J. C. Adams, J. W. Stephenson 
Goldleaf— R. H. Barbour, Sherrill Akins 
Liberty — P. L. Campbell 

Henderson (two sets buyers) 

Banners — C. J. Fleming, C. B. Turner, E. C. Huff, L. B. Wilkinson 

Carolina — W. B. Daniel, F. S. Royster 

Moore's Big Henderson — A. H. Moore 

Farmers — W. J. Alston 

High Price — C. J. Fleming, C. B. Turner, E. C. Huff, L. B. Wilkinson 

Liberty — George T. Robertson 

Ellington — F. H. Ellington & Sons 

Louisburg (one set buyers) 

Big Franklin — A. N. Wilson, S. T. & H. B. Cottrell 
Southside A & B — Charlie Ford 
Union — G. C. Harris, N. F. Freeman 

Oxford (two sets buyers) 

Banner — W. L. Mitchell, Jr., David Mitchell 

Mangum — Farmers — T. B. Williams, Julian Adcock, S. B. Knott, Joe 

Cutts 
Fleming No. 1 & 2 — G. B. Watkins, D. T. Currin, H. G. Taylor 
Planters — C. R. Watkins, J. R. & S. J. Watkins 
Johnson — C. R. Watkins, J. R. & S. J. Watkins 
Owens No. 1 & 2 — J. S. Watkins, L. Gregory 
Granville — L. S. Bryan, W. W. Yeargin 

Sanford (one set buyers) 

Big Sanford — Joe M. Wilkins, G. T. Hancock, Flint Phillips 

Wood 3-W No. 1 & 2 — W. F. Wood 

Pucketts No. 1 & 2 — C. W. Puckett 

Wilkins — Joe M. Wilkins, G. T. Hancock, Flint Phillips 

Farmers — Fred Easterly, W. F. Wood 

Twin City — W. M. Carter, T. W. Mansfield 

AVarrenton (one set buyers) 
Boyd's — W. P. Burwell 
Center No. 1 & 2 — M. D. Carroll 
Currin's No. 1 & 2 — D. G. Currin, C. W. Currin 
Farmers — E. G. Tarwater 
Thompson — C. E. Thompson 



2S 



OLD BELT 

Burlington (one set buyers) 

Carolina — Jule Allen, Bill & Jack McCauley 

Coble — N. C. Newman, L. O. Winstead, R. W. Rainey 

Farmers — Jule Allen, Bill & Jack McCauley 

Greensboro (one set buyers) 

Greensboro Tobacco Warehouse Co. — R. C. Coleman, Mgr. 

Guilford County Whse. Co. — J. R. Pell, H. P. Smothers, W. B. Hall 

Madison (one set buyers) 

New Brick — R. T. Chilton, S. F. Webster 
Carolina — R. T. Chilton, S. F. Webster 
Sharp & Smith — W. S. Smith, H. A. Fagg 
Farmers — W. S. Smith, H. A. Fagg 

Mebane (one set buyers) 

Harris 1 & 2 — C. A. Harris, Blaine Gorrell 
Planters — J. G. McCray, J. B. Keck, R. D. Tickle 

Mt. Airy (one set buyers) 

New Dixie 1 & 2 — Oscar L. Badgett 

Liberty — R. C. Simmons, Jr., F. V. Dearmin, Dave Smith 

Planters & Jones — -Tom and Frank Jones, Buck White 

Heidsville (one set buyers) 

Browns — G. E. Smith, P. D. McMichael, D. Huffines 
Farmers — G. E. Smith, P. D. McMichael, D. Huffines 
Leader — A. P. Sands, A. G. Irvin, J. L. Pennix 
Watts — A. P. Sands, A. G. Irvin, J. L. Pennix 
Smothers — T. B. & J. M. Smothers 

Roxboro (one set buyers) 

Farmers — Lindsay Wagstaff, R. L. Hester 

Hyco — W. R. Jones, F. J. Hester, Geo. Walker 

Foacre — H. W. Winstead, Jr., J. H. Merritt, D. L. Whitfield 

Planters No. 1 & 2 — T. O. Pass 

Winstead — T. T. & Elmo Mitchell 

Stoneville (one set buyers) 

Brown's No. 1 & 2 — O. P. Joyce, Roy Carter 
Farmers — F. A. Brown, P. M. Moorfield 
Piedmont — J. J. Webster, G. D. Rakestraw 
Slate No. 1 & 2 — F. A. Brown, P. M. Moorfield 
Powell — Elmer, Dillard, Marvin Powell 

Winston-Salem (four sets buyers) 

Brown — R. W. Newsome, W. B. Simpson 

Carolina — H. M. Bouldin, G. H. Robertson 

Dixie — Floyd Joyce, W. G. Sheets, J. R. Pell, M. M. Joyner 

Farmers — Floyd Joyce, W. G. Sheets, J. R. Pell, M. M. Joyner 

Glenn Co. — C. T. Glenn, D. L. Harris, Chas. Dalton 

Liberty — M. M. Joyner, J. R. Pell, W. G. Sheets, Floyd Joyce 

29 



Winston-Salem — Cont'd. 

Pepper No. 1 & 2 — F. D. Pepper 

Planters — Foss Smithdeal, Frank Smithdeal, Wes Watson 

Taylor — Paul Taylor, J. H. Dyer 

Big Winston — R. T. & J. F. Carter 

Cooks No. 1 & 2 — B. E. Cook, C. B. Strickland, William Fowler, H. A. 

Thomas 
George-Davis — Foss & Frank Smithdeal, Wes Watson 

X. C. BURLEY BELT 

Asheville (two sets buyers — second set incomplete) 
Carolina — Max Roberts, Mgr. 
Dixie No. 1 & 2 — J. C. Adams, L. J. Hill 
Planters No. 1 & 2 — J. W. Stewart, Fred D. Cockfield 
Bernard-Walker Warehouses — James E. Walker, Mgr. 
Big Burley — J. C. Adams, L. J. Hill 
Day's — Charlie Day 

Boone (one set buyers) 

Mountain Burley No. 1 & 2 — -Joe E. Coleman 
Farmers Burley — Joe E. Coleman 

AVest Jefferson (one set buyers) 

Tri-State Burley — C. C. Taylor, Rex Taylor 
Planters — C. C. Taylor, Rex Taylor 
Jarrell's — C. C. Taylor, Rex Taylor 



30 



Domestic Cigarette Consumption 
By Kinds-! 956 




Total Domestic Consumption 398 Billion Cigarettes